ETHDenver Proved the Blockchain Community Is a Powerful One

 ETHDenver set the stage for one fanstastic hackathon and conference event.

ETHDenver set the stage for one fanstastic hackathon and conference event.

Shortly after writing a piece for VICE News on blockchain in healthcare, I was invited by OPOLIS' John Paller to ETHDenver. The three-day hackathon and conference event was held at Sports Castle and featured panelists like Joseph Lubin, Erik Voorhees, Dmitry Buterin, and Kevin Owacki. The first annual hackathon was Ethereum’s largest to date, and along with the panels and workshops, there were art installations, a dance party, and hackers from 31 states and 21 countries as far away as Cairo! Companies like Blockgeeks, Consensys, Ox Protocol, DAOstack, Cellarius, Maiden, OPOLIS, and many others sponsored the event, which was free for attendees.

Panel topics for the weekend included “Decentralized Governance, “Token Based Business Models,” “Art on the Blockchain,” and more. Workshops were held nightly on various subjects as well, while hackers worked away on several floors of the six-story building piecing together the newest tech and game ideas for the blockchain. The event even boasted its own currency, the Colorado Coin, which users could use to purchase meals outside of the event at local food trucks.

Regulation of crypto and blockchain tech was a main discussion at various panels at the conference this year, whether it was regarding liquidity and compliance, crypto taxation, or current US legislation on how tokens are defined.

Said Erik Voorhees to a sweep of cheers and applause during one panel, “I’m thankful people have built things without regulatory clarity and you should continue to build things.”

Build they did, and by day three of ETHDenver, seven winning teams presented their various projects, which ranged from using the blockchain to turn on a lightbulb (a marriage between blockchain and the internet of things), a cyberpunk cryptocurrency trading game based on Drugwars, a blockchain-based system to record blood donation in healthcare, and a dApp that splits your private key between trusted friends for safekeeping. Apprentio even had a team of all teens from local high-schools who created “Cryptokicks,” a Yeezy-inspired digital tennis shoe collectible similar to CryptoKitties but made for sneakerheads.

Overall, the weekend proved the blockchain community is a powerful one- powerfully supportive of new ideas, powerfully supportive of blockchain technology, and most of all, powerfully supportive of each other.

Said John Paller of the event, “This has been even more than I expected in every way.”

If only for three days, ETHDenver brought key players together with hackers, industry insiders, and even newbies for one fantastic event. Make sure to keep up with ETHDenver and their plans for next year on Slack.